Danger Land

It's a jungle out there, don't forget your raincoat

7,446 notes

It’s disgusting. “I have a right to your naked body or images that you’ve sent to your husband, or lover.” It’s disgusting. It’s this violent, abusive violation of womanhood—of divine womanhood. It’s violent, and it’s misogynistic, and it’s revolting, and it’s another example of what this distance has enabled us to do—it’s enabled us to be disassociated from each other. There’s enough awful shit coming from it that hopefully we’ll get to the point of, “OK, wait a second.” What’s scary is that we haven’t reached that point yet, and there hasn’t been a referendum put on it. The Internet is the new Wild West. There’s a guy now taking these pictures and putting them up in an art gallery. What fucking right does he have to do that? It’s absolutely revolting.
Andrew Garfield on celebrity nude hacking scandal (via chalriepace)

(Source: andrewgarfielddaily, via themarysue)

323,580 notes

evererika:

deepinmyb0nes:

iamprogress:

"I think every woman at one point or another in their life has been called a bitch. For a long time I had a real problem with that word, I didn’t like it and I thought it was derogatory. But I’ve gotten to a place now where I’ve made a lot of peace with it. It’s been so overused and made to seem so derogatory towards woman that I’ve adapted it into an empowering feeling for myself. If I’m a bitch then I’m a bitch, if that’s what an assertive woman is to you. So I’ve sort of adapted it as a badge of honor."

TTTHHHIIISSSSS

A+

(Source: therealxtina, via ruinedchildhood)

44,265 notes

siren-comstock:

sometimes i think about how portal was a game with no male characters, featuring a WOC protagonist and an excellent female antagonist who were both anything but sexualised, and yet somehow still managed to create an interesting and engaging experience for female and male gamers alike, win awards, and get a sequel, and then i look at people who say “games with female protagonists don’t sell” and i laugh. for a very long time.

(Source: fanservicealiens, via wonderfreakingwoman)

347 notes

tamorapierce:

profeminist:

BEST NEWS EVER! (Ok, it’s up there).
Alison Bechdel awarded MacArthur genius grant 
Alison Bechdel, all time superhero, creator of lesbian comic strip Dykes To Watch Out For (which I’ve read and loved forever), The Bechdel Test, and the auto-biographical graphic novels Fun Home (need to read) and Are You My Mother? (read it, amazing), has been awarded a MACCARTHUR GENIUS GRANT FOR $625K! 
In her books she talks about how money issues have made her life hard. Even though she’s a legendary and popular cartoonist for decades, in modern times with print publications folding and gay publications combining, there have been fewer paying customers for her work. 
It really made me sad to read about a hero having trouble paying her bills, even while working! Seeing this news makes me smile ear to ear. ONE MILLION LIKES.

The recipients of this year’s MacArthur Foundation ”Genius Grant” — a no-strings attached, five-year, $625,000 award given to individuals who show “exceptional creativity in their work” — were announced Wednesday and among them was a true star: Alison Bechdel. 
Bechdel, 54, is a well-known cartoonist whose comic strip “Dykes to Watch Out For" achieved cult status for its honest and hilarious representation of queer culture. She’s also an accomplished author — her 2006 graphic memoir appeared on the New York Times best-seller list and won an Eisner Award. 
"Bechdel is changing our notions of the contemporary memoir and expanding the expressive potential of the graphic form," the MacArthur Foundation wrote in choosing her.  

Story on Mic.com

Hurray for Bechdel!  Time to work without worrying about bills!

Yay!

tamorapierce:

profeminist:

BEST NEWS EVER! (Ok, it’s up there).

Alison Bechdel awarded MacArthur genius grant 

Alison Bechdel, all time superhero, creator of lesbian comic strip Dykes To Watch Out For (which I’ve read and loved forever), The Bechdel Test, and the auto-biographical graphic novels Fun Home (need to read) and Are You My Mother? (read it, amazing), has been awarded a MACCARTHUR GENIUS GRANT FOR $625K! 

In her books she talks about how money issues have made her life hard. Even though she’s a legendary and popular cartoonist for decades, in modern times with print publications folding and gay publications combining, there have been fewer paying customers for her work. 

It really made me sad to read about a hero having trouble paying her bills, even while working! Seeing this news makes me smile ear to ear. ONE MILLION LIKES.

The recipients of this year’s MacArthur Foundation ”Genius Grant” — a no-strings attached, five-year, $625,000 award given to individuals who show “exceptional creativity in their work” — were announced Wednesday and among them was a true star: Alison Bechdel. 

Bechdel, 54, is a well-known cartoonist whose comic strip “Dykes to Watch Out For" achieved cult status for its honest and hilarious representation of queer culture. She’s also an accomplished author — her 2006 graphic memoir appeared on the New York Times best-seller list and won an Eisner Award. 

"Bechdel is changing our notions of the contemporary memoir and expanding the expressive potential of the graphic form," the MacArthur Foundation wrote in choosing her.  

Story on Mic.com

Hurray for Bechdel!  Time to work without worrying about bills!

Yay!

285 notes

profeminist:

Meredith Vieira shares her own history of domestic violence
The daytime host is using her brand-new show as a platform to raise awareness about violence against women 
(TW for abuse)

On Wednesday’s episode of her eponymous new talk show, Meredith Vieira is set to take on the complex social justice issue currently dominating the news: domestic violence. Following the lead of survivors who have shared the stories on social media over the past several days of why they stayed or left abusive relationships, Vieira shares the details of her own past experience with intimate partner violence, making the conversation personal.
“I was in an abusive relationship many, many years ago, as a young woman,” Vieira says. “It started out that we would have a fight and he would grab my arm. I didn’t think a lot about it. Then it turned into pushing me against the wall. Then it went beyond that to actually taking his hand and grabbing my face and saying, ‘I could ruin your career if I wanted to, and no one would want you.’”
Vieira explains that despite having a job and the means to leave the relationship, she still stayed — until she was offered a job in another state, and finally felt that she had the strength and ability to leave. She claims she stayed mostly out of fear and guilt, as many women do. But those are not the only reasons people do not leave abusive partners; every story has its own added complexities. ”When people talk about domestic violence, it is really, really a complicated issue,” Vieira says. “It is not so easy to just get away. You think it would be, but it is not.”  
The host ends with a warning and advice for anyone who finds herself or himself in an abusive relationship, and reminds everyone that it does not just fall to victims and survivors to stop the cycle of violence. ”We all have to accept the fact that it’s not just an issue with the NFL,” Vieira says. “It’s an issue with all of our lives, and until we take it seriously, more and more women are going to get abused.”

Story by Jenny Kutner and Video on Salon.com

profeminist:

Meredith Vieira shares her own history of domestic violence

The daytime host is using her brand-new show as a platform to raise awareness about violence against women 

(TW for abuse)

On Wednesday’s episode of her eponymous new talk show, Meredith Vieira is set to take on the complex social justice issue currently dominating the news: domestic violence. Following the lead of survivors who have shared the stories on social media over the past several days of why they stayed or left abusive relationships, Vieira shares the details of her own past experience with intimate partner violence, making the conversation personal.

“I was in an abusive relationship many, many years ago, as a young woman,” Vieira says. “It started out that we would have a fight and he would grab my arm. I didn’t think a lot about it. Then it turned into pushing me against the wall. Then it went beyond that to actually taking his hand and grabbing my face and saying, ‘I could ruin your career if I wanted to, and no one would want you.’”

Vieira explains that despite having a job and the means to leave the relationship, she still stayed — until she was offered a job in another state, and finally felt that she had the strength and ability to leave. She claims she stayed mostly out of fear and guilt, as many women do. But those are not the only reasons people do not leave abusive partners; every story has its own added complexities. ”When people talk about domestic violence, it is really, really a complicated issue,” Vieira says. “It is not so easy to just get away. You think it would be, but it is not.”  

The host ends with a warning and advice for anyone who finds herself or himself in an abusive relationship, and reminds everyone that it does not just fall to victims and survivors to stop the cycle of violence. ”We all have to accept the fact that it’s not just an issue with the NFL,” Vieira says. “It’s an issue with all of our lives, and until we take it seriously, more and more women are going to get abused.”

Story by Jenny Kutner and Video on Salon.com

(via tamorapierce)