Danger Land

It's a jungle out there, don't forget your raincoat

1,076 notes

fixyourwritinghabits:

epicreads:

athenasaurus:

reelbrains:

beyoursledgehammer:

Sabriel by Margot Wood

In the early 1990s, Garth Nix went to a flea market in Sydney, Australia and looked through a box of old, early 1900s photographs that were being sold for a dollar a piece. As he flipped through the photos he came across a photograph of a young woman in a military style coat wearing a belt made out of bells and holding a sword. He studied the photo, wondering who this mysterious woman was. He purchased the photo, took it home and promptly wrote the draft for his young adult high-fantasy novel, Sabriel. THIS DID NOT ACTUALLY HAPPEN. But what if it did? And that, my beautiful friends, is the idea behind this fauxto. I wanted to do something different for my Young Adults fauxto series. I’ve recently been doing character portraits and knew I wanted to do one for Sabriel, but to give it a twist, I wanted to take a fauxto of a real person that would serve as the inspiration for the fictional character. Does that make any sense? Basically, in my imagination, Garth Nix based Sabriel off a real person and I wanted to explore what that woman would look like and voila, you have the image before you.

(Please do not remove credit/description)

My friend Margot (The Real Fauxtographer) has an amazing series where she interprets YA novels into these wonderful, wonderful photos (see also, her Code Name Verity photo, and her photo for Shadow and Bone - amazing).
I had the privilege of sitting for her on her Sabriel photo. Personal bias aside, this is a pretty special photo to me because Sabriel is one of my absolute favorite books ever, and she’s a heroine near and dear to my heart.
When Margot first approached me about this portrait, I shared with her that a lot of readers may disagree with her interpretation because Sabriel is interpreted as white (I mean, it’s pretty canon). Her response -  “you’re pale, you have dark hair, you’re Sabriel” - while simple, is gratifying and validating to me. Not a lot of people would be flexible to the idea of having a POC pose as a traditionally white heroine, making this doubly special, and even more awesome.
View the rest of Margot’s wonderful fauxtos here, and give her a shout on Twitter, will you? She’s pretty funny.

i saw this and thought “omg that looks JUST LIKE reelbs” and then i saw this post and i’m so thrilled it really is you because this series kicks so much ass and this is a really really great interpretation

SABRIEL!

Oh wow, what a cool idea

Sabriel is one of my all time favorite characters (and series for that matter). I think this is such an engaging portrait especially the look in her eyes. It SO encompasses the character of Sabriel: nerve and uncertainty. GREAT portrait and great characterization!

fixyourwritinghabits:

epicreads:

athenasaurus:

reelbrains:

beyoursledgehammer:

Sabriel by Margot Wood

In the early 1990s, Garth Nix went to a flea market in Sydney, Australia and looked through a box of old, early 1900s photographs that were being sold for a dollar a piece. As he flipped through the photos he came across a photograph of a young woman in a military style coat wearing a belt made out of bells and holding a sword. He studied the photo, wondering who this mysterious woman was. He purchased the photo, took it home and promptly wrote the draft for his young adult high-fantasy novel, Sabriel

THIS DID NOT ACTUALLY HAPPEN. But what if it did? And that, my beautiful friends, is the idea behind this fauxto. 

I wanted to do something different for my Young Adults fauxto series. I’ve recently been doing character portraits and knew I wanted to do one for Sabriel, but to give it a twist, I wanted to take a fauxto of a real person that would serve as the inspiration for the fictional character. Does that make any sense? 

Basically, in my imagination, Garth Nix based Sabriel off a real person and I wanted to explore what that woman would look like and voila, you have the image before you.

(Please do not remove credit/description)

My friend Margot (The Real Fauxtographer) has an amazing series where she interprets YA novels into these wonderful, wonderful photos (see also, her Code Name Verity photo, and her photo for Shadow and Bone - amazing).

I had the privilege of sitting for her on her Sabriel photo. Personal bias aside, this is a pretty special photo to me because Sabriel is one of my absolute favorite books ever, and she’s a heroine near and dear to my heart.

When Margot first approached me about this portrait, I shared with her that a lot of readers may disagree with her interpretation because Sabriel is interpreted as white (I mean, it’s pretty canon). Her response -  “you’re pale, you have dark hair, you’re Sabriel” - while simple, is gratifying and validating to me. Not a lot of people would be flexible to the idea of having a POC pose as a traditionally white heroine, making this doubly special, and even more awesome.

View the rest of Margot’s wonderful fauxtos here, and give her a shout on Twitter, will you? She’s pretty funny.

i saw this and thought “omg that looks JUST LIKE reelbs” and then i saw this post and i’m so thrilled it really is you because this series kicks so much ass and this is a really really great interpretation

SABRIEL!

Oh wow, what a cool idea

Sabriel is one of my all time favorite characters (and series for that matter). I think this is such an engaging portrait especially the look in her eyes. It SO encompasses the character of Sabriel: nerve and uncertainty. GREAT portrait and great characterization!

33,076 notes

Changing the way we talk is not political correctness run amok. It reflects an admirable willingness to acknowledge others who once were barely visible to the dominant culture, and to recognize that something that may seem innocent to you may be painful to others.

David Plotz, Why Slate Will No Longer Refer to Washington’s NFL Team as the Redskins

This is the most important thing to understand: something that may seem innocent to you may be painful to others

(via howtofightloneliness)

(Source: dancingwithdiversity, via jiddlehiddle)

3,091 notes

policymic:

7 ways we can fix gender inequality other than with confidence

The most recent encouragement to just “fake it til you make it” comes from Katty Kay and Claire Shipman who published a feature on the “confidence gap” in the Atlantic. In the undoubtedly well-meaning piece, Kay and Shipman share troubling research outlining an equally gloomy picture: Women undervalue their accomplishments, and it’s holding them back in the workplace.

Although it’s true that some women suffer from more self-defeating thoughts and lower self-esteem, gender inequality can’t be reduced to mental health issues. Women’s lack of opportunities in the workplace are due to much deeper issues, and it’s time we admit that. Instead of telling women to change their personalities, maybe it’s time we take a look at the entire system.

Here’s a (non-exhaustive) list of ways we can help women that don’t include telling them just to hold their head up high. 

Read more | Follow policymic

(via upworthy)